Top Stories for the Week of January 12, 2016

  • Episode 434
  • January 12, 2016
Advertisement
Download Video (145.65 MB) Download MP3 (14.12 MB) Donate

Here are the stories we're following for the week of Tuesday January 12, 2016


Google has banished several apps after finding out they were making unauthorized downloads and fake reviews in Google Play.

Google has banished several apps after finding out they were making unauthorized downloads and fake reviews in Google Play.

Google has banished 13 Android apps from its Play marketplace after security researchers found the apps made unauthorized downloads and attempted to gain root privileges that allowed them to survive factory resets.

One of the 13 apps, which was known as Honeycomb, had as many as one million downloads before it was removed, according to researchers from Lookout, the mobile security provider that spotted the malicious entries.

They said, "The explanation for the apps’ high ratings and hundreds-of-thousands of downloads is the malware itself. First off, some of the apps are fully-functioning games. Some are highly rated because they are fun to play. Mischievously, though, the apps are capable of using compromised devices to download and positively review other malicious apps in the Play store by the same authors. This helps increase the download figures in the Play Store. Specifically, it attempts to detect if a device is rooted, and if so, copies several files to the /system partition in an effort to ensure persistence, even after a complete factory reset."

The best option for removing these malicious apps is to back up any data worth keeping and then reflash the ROM supplied by the device maker. As always, people should remain cautious and alert when downloading Android apps and be aware that even when apps have been admitted to Google Play and receive a large number of positive reviews, there's no guarantee that they can be trusted.

Source: arstechnica.com

Sent to us by: Roy W. Nash


Online video is about to get a lot more colorful as YouTube joins the likes of Netflix and Amazon with HDR video.

Online video is about to get a lot more colorful as YouTube joins the likes of Netflix and Amazon with HDR video.

With big-name TV makers and movie studios all pledging to support high dynamic range--or HDR--technology, it was only be a matter of time until the world's biggest online video platform got in on the action. According to Mashable, YouTube's Chief Business Officer, confirmed that the service will soon roll out support for HDR, allowing streamers to watch videos in a lot more detail.

While HDR has become a buzzword, it's likely to make a big difference to the way you watch TV and movies this year. In brief terms, HDR captures a wider range of contrast and brightness. The resulting images show greater detail in darker parts of the screen and highlights a wider range of colors, allowing you to pick out details that you may not have noticed before.

What it does mean, though, is that you will need a compatible TV or display to view YouTube's range of HDR videos the way they're meant to be viewed. LG, Sony and Vizio will soon release new 4K sets with high dynamic range support built in and PC makers are following the trend. Netflix and Amazon are on board too, ensuring that streamers can also board the HDR bandwagon.

Source: www.engadget.com

Sent to us by: Jeff Weston


Lumosity's brain-training games 'deceived customers'

Lumosity's brain-training games 'deceived customers'

The company behind brain-training game Lumosity has agreed to pay $2m to settle false marketing claims.

Lumos Labs had said its games helped users perform better at work and even alleviated the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

But the US Federal Trade Commission alleged it did not have scientific evidence to back up the claims.

The company must now contact all of its customers to offer them the chance to cancel their subscriptions.

Launched in 2007, Lumosity consists of 40 online games, purportedly designed to train specific areas of the brain.

In advertising, it claimed using the games for 10 to 15 minutes three or four times a week could help users achieve their "full potential in every aspect of life".

It also said the games could alleviate the symptoms of dementia, strokes and brain injuries.

But the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection director, Jessica Rich, said: "Lumosity preyed on consumers' fears about age-related cognitive decline."

The games had been "widely promoted" through TV and radio ads on networks including CNN, the History Channel and Fox News.

The FTC said Lumos had also failed to disclose that some consumer testimonials on its website had been solicited through contests that promised prizes, including a free iPad.

The FTC had wanted to fine Lumos Labs $50m, but said it was accepting the smaller sum of $2m because of the company's "financial condition".

The company must also offer customers "an easy way to cancel their subscriptions", which range from $15 to $300.

In January last year the company said it had 70 million members worldwide.

Source: www.bbc.com

Sent to us by: Roy W. Nash


Microsoft has revealed details about the data it is tracking via its new operating system, Windows 10.

Microsoft has revealed details about the data it is tracking via its new operating system, Windows 10.

Microsoft has revealed details about the data it is tracking via its new operating system, Windows 10.

In a blog, the firm listed statistics on how many minutes had been spent by users in total in the Edge browser and the number of photographs which had been viewed in the Photo app.

The firm also said that Windows 10 was now active on over 200 million devices.
However, some people have questioned whether the data tracking is a threat to privacy.

Since Windows 10 was launched, Microsoft has been tracking information about how those with the OS are using it.
Until now though, relatively little has been known about what data are being collected.

Security expert Prof Alan Woodward told the BBC he was interested to know the long-term plans for the data.

"[This information] might be collected for one purpose, but how long will it be stored for? What else are they going to use it for?" he said.

"As soon as it goes outside the [country] it's no longer protected by things like the [country's] Data Protection laws." and it is not clear where data relating to Windows 10 is transmitted and stored.

Source: www.bbc.com

Sent to us by: Roy W. Nash


A father in Pembroke, Ontario is warning parents of kids with Xboxes after his 17 year old ran up a credit card bill of more than $8,000.

A father in Pembroke, Ontario is warning parents of kids with Xboxes after his 17 year old ran up a credit card bill of more than $8,000.

A father in Pembroke, Ontario, is holding up his latest credit card bill as a warning for parents whose children have Xboxes.

Lance Perkins says he was shocked to learn he was on the hook for the money, after his 17-year-old son racked up thousands of dollars in online gaming charges.

The costs first appeared on an earlier credit card bill, but Perkins says he didn't originally notice them.

By the time the next bill arrived, the total amount owing had grown to $8,800 with interest.

Xbox charges annual fees so that gamers can access multiplayer games online. There are also separate fees to purchase games, additions and extensions.

But Perkins says the business scheme is misleading, especially for a young person without a credit card of their own.

Xbox does offer tips for parents to avoid "unauthorized purchases by children."

The console recommends creating separate Xbox accounts for each user, and making a password for signing in and making purchases.

And if children want to buy games on their own, the gaming system recommends parents purchase a gift card for their child, rather than providing access to their credit card-linked accounts.

Source: www.ctvnews.ca


Discussion

Advertisement
Advertisement

Technology TV
Episode 501 Live:

Being Watched

Twitter Posts

Advertisement

Site News

Robbie Ferguson

Don't worry if you find something broken... this is a work in progress.


Robbie Ferguson

I still need to fix several broken images and create more content... this is a huge undertaking! Enjoy!

Robbie Ferguson

User accounts are disabled for the moment as I work to implement more features into the new web site. Check back soon!

Login to Category5

Error message here!

Hide Error message here!

Forgot your password?

Register on Category5

Error message here!

Error message here!

Hide Error message here!

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Error message here!

Back to log-in

Close